Saga Ringmar

City Weekend Beijing: “How to Detect Problems with Your Child’s Eyesight”

In the first years of your child’s life, their eyes are going through a lot of changes. They start out their existence seeing only in shades of gray, but by their first birthday, bam! The world becomes full of light, shapes and a dazzling array of colors.

However, sometimes things can go a little wrong, but if your child is very young, it’s hard to detect emerging problems with their eyesight. What are common eyesight issues children face—and what symptoms should we be (ahem) keeping an eye out for? Read the whole article here. 

City Weekend Beijing: “Carbon Emissions to Decrease in Northern China”

The news is that Shenhua Group, the state-owned mining and energy company, has completed its upgrades that will dramatically decrease coal-burning in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region.

So does that mean more blue skies, sunshine and good times? Well, maybe. But when the environment is concerned, things aren’t always that simple.

Shenhua Group’s new upgrades mean the annual emission of dust, SO2 (sulfur dioxide) and NOx (nitrogen oxide) in the north will go down by 84 percent, 71 percent and 83 percent respectively. The upgrades have taken 3 years and have cost the company 2.35 billion yuan. However, when you’re sitting in a gas chamber it’s hard to empathize with a state-owned coal-power house’s financial plight. Read the whole article here. 

City Weekend Beijing: “Catherine de France’s Keratin Protein Treatment”

After the strain of a polluted and freezing cold winter, it’s about time someone gave your tangled locks a good seeing to. We headed over to Catherine de France to check out their keratin protein treatment to see if it could tame our stressed-out hair. We were led into a dimly lit room where an assistant was tasked with applying shampoo and administering a scalp massage while the mellowing voice of Billie Holiday emanated from the speakers. Back in the salon seat, another technician paints the keratin solution over each strand of hair. The process takes about 10 minutes, which is a good opportunity to catch up on celebrity gossip courtesy of the many English-language fashion magazines (just like the salons at home). After the wait, our hair was blow-dried and straightened to within an inch of its life, but instead of them looking over-processed, the result was dazzling—our strands glowed and were silky smooth to touch. The treatment is supposed to last three months and, if you care for it correctly, the result is shinier, smoother, and thicker hair for much longer than a typical treatment would last. Catherine recommends doing the treatment before the summer starts, so you won’t have to scout out a salon on your vacation (you know, after the heat tries to kill it dead). The treatment costs from RMB2,000-3,000 depending on hair length. Read the whole review here. 

City Weekend Beijing: “How Diabetes Can Affect Your Eyesight”

Diabetic retinopathy is caused by the narrowing of arteries behind the retina. This leads to several complications which are divided into stages. In the first, the damage or narrowing of the artery behind the retina causes the contents of the artery to seep into the eye. Patients in this stage will begin to experience problems with their vision, including blurred vision or darkening of sight. The second stage is even more serious. Here, new blood vessels form behind the eye and since these new vessels are fragile, they burst easily, which causes blood to seep into the eye. When this happens, patients might see black dots, or experience blurred vision—in serious cases, patients are only able to distinguish light from dark. The scary news is, while this blood may take days or months to clear, in some cases, it may take years or never clear at all. Read the rest of the article here.

City Weekend Beijing: “Health Matters: Helicobacter Pylori”

Gut Feeling

Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common bacterial infections in human beings. However, studies have shown that in a minority of cases, this bacteria may result in several diseases including gastritis, stomach ulcers, and even gastric cancer. In Asia, where gastric cancer is more common than anywhere else, it’s important to understand what helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is and whether it’s worth getting screened and treated.

What Is It?

H. pylori is a bacterium that is well-adapted to survive in the human gut and in most cases does absolutely nothing. The consensus among experts is that about 50 percent of the world’s population is infected with H. pylori.

However, in some cases, the bacteria can lead to diseases like gastritis (inflammation of the stomach lining) and stomach ulcers. Most importantly, helicobacter pylori has also been classified as a carcinogen for gastric cancer by the International Agency for Research on Cancer since 1995, and there is also evidence that H. pylori infection is a risk factor for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoma (a lymphatic cancer of the stomach).

Read the rest of the article here.